The Cost of Doing Business Formula: 3 Smart Steps to Follow

The Cost of Doing Business is nothing but an equation that includes non-reimbursable expenses plus your desired salary. To figure out how much you will need in order to sustainably run your company, take a logical and comprehensive approach when thinking about your cost of doing business (CODB).

The Cost of Doing Business Formula: 3 Smart Steps to Follow

The cost of doing business formula is a comprehensive approach to determining how much money you will need to run your business sustainably.
Before we even consider pricing any of our services, we must have a firm grasp and understanding of our cost of doing business (CODB).
Because the word "cost" is right there in the name, this may be referred to as CODB. This would appear to be a simple calculation, but it is not. It's difficult because the CODB is made up of many different factors and variables, some of which are more fixed than others.
A sequential equation produced your CODB. Total annual costs equal non-reimbursable expenses plus desired salary.

How much does it cost to do business?
The Cost of Doing Business is a simple equation that includes non-reimbursable expenses as well as your desired salary. CODB is calculated by dividing the total annual costs by the number of billable days.
When considering your cost of doing business, take a logical and comprehensive approach to determining how much you will need to sustainably run your company (CODB). When you first start, it is critical to take this seriously in order to understand your financial needs and demands.

The number of billable days is the number of days you are open for business; for example, if you are an accountant who works Monday through Friday, your billable days are five (5).
If you work every day but only do business on weekdays, your billable days will be five (5). You have six (6) billable days if you work Monday through Friday and conduct business on Saturday.
Similarly, if you only operate on Saturdays and Sundays, then those two days equal your total number of billable days. To calculate your CODB, you must first determine how much you will earn each day. Finally, it's just math!
This comprehensive approach has a straightforward equation. CODB is the sum of your total annual costs divided by the number of billable days. To achieve your business objectives, you must understand strategic planning.

What is the formula for calculating the cost of doing business?

The Cost of Doing Business Formula is a straightforward equation that divides total annual costs by the number of billable days.
The CODB is the sum of your desired salary and non-reimbursable expenses. This comprehensive approach includes a logical and simple calculation to determine how much money you will need to run your business sustainably.
After you've compiled all of your expenses, it's time to develop your cost of doing business formula.

Your CODB is calculated by adding your non-reimbursable expenses to your desired salary. This comprehensive approach includes a simple calculation to determine how much money you will need to run your business sustainably.
Cost Varieties
Direct expenses: Direct costs are expenses that can be directly linked to a specific product or service offered by the company. Direct costs can be calculated using a product-costing system, in which the cost of each item sold is assigned to the inventory account until it is sold.

Indirect costs are all other expenses incurred while running a business that are not covered by indirect costs. They include rent, administrative salaries, and other operational costs necessary to keep the business running.
Selling expenses are those associated with selling goods or services to customers, such as order taking, shipping charges, and marketing costs such as brochures and commercials.
Annual Total Expenses: Total annual expenses (also known as CODB) are calculated by adding the following cost categories: direct costs, indirect costs, and selling expenses.
Non-Reimbursable Costs: These are costs that cannot be passed on to the customer. They include expenses such as rent, administrative salaries, utilities, taxes, insurance, and so on.
Desired Salary: Your desired salary is the amount of money you want to earn each year, and it must cover at least your direct costs (i.e., the cost of labor).
Total number of hours worked: The number of billable hours worked is calculated by dividing 1,600 by your desired salary. If you want to make $40,000 per year and work a 40-hour week for 48 weeks, your billable hours are 80 (1,600/40 = 40 x 48).

Various Situations that necessitate CODB Calculations

The following are some scenarios in which you will need to calculate the cost of doing business.

  1. New Business: An existing company decides to open another location in order to expand their business.
  2. Outsourcing: A company decides to outsource some of its labour in order to streamline operations. This means they will no longer require the same number of employees as before.
    As a result, it is critical to understand what percentage of revenue should be allocated to labour expenses in order to determine whether or not outsourcing will be beneficial.
  3. Expansion: An existing company decides to expand their operations by adding a new product line or making major changes to how they run their current business.

    How do we figure it out?
    There are several approaches to this equation, and you can choose the one that works best for your company. You can add up the total annual cost of all non-reimbursable expenses, such as rent or equipment costs.
    Divide that total by the number of days in your accounting period. This provides you with a daily cost of doing business, which can aid in the ongoing guidance of your budget decisions.
  4. Gather the Receipts!
    You can also calculate CODB in a different way. This one requires you to collect all of your business expense receipts and total them for each day of your accounting period.
    If these costs are significant, divide the total number of days in your accounting period (e.g., month or year). This can be a great way to show which days of the month your company incurs the most expenses.
    Receipts to gather include:
    Utilities (electricity, water, gas) (electricity, water, gas)
    Rent/Mortgage
    Wages and salaries (this includes not only your salary but also the salaries of any employees you pay)
    Telephone and Internet service fees
    Supplies and equipment for the office
    Fees for building upkeep
    Brochures and flyers are examples of marketing expenses.
    If you use a car or fuel for business purposes, you will incur costs (keep track of how many miles you drive each week)
    Payroll taxes such as unemployment, FICA, and others (deducted from your employees' wages)
  5. Determine Your Fee
    As an entrepreneur or small business owner, managing your time is the first step toward controlling costs and increasing productivity.
    Setting your hourly rate is a great way to keep track of how much time you spend on different projects or tasks.
    This can help guide budgeting decisions as well as identify which areas are taking up too much time and need to be adjusted to meet goals within specific time frames.
    Your rate should be high enough to cover your CODB plus the cost of non-reimbursable expenses while also providing an acceptable profit margin.
    It may take some time to find an appropriate rate, so keep track of your time and record how much you earn per hour.

    When you work for someone else, you are typically paid biweekly or monthly. It is critical for an entrepreneur to manage deadlines and projects within reasonable timeframes (e.g., by the end of each week or month).
    An online invoicing system that allows you to create a draught invoice and send it for review before submitting it is one simple way to accomplish this.
    An invoicing system can assist you in keeping track of outstanding hours as well as the status of each project. If you use online invoicing, your clients will have access to this information through their accounts as well.
    This lets them know right away that you're working on their project. It's critical to understand all of the factors that influence how much it costs to run your business so that you can plan for future growth and financial success!
  6. Perform the Math

After you've gathered all of your receipts, it's time to do some math. There are a few different methods for calculating your cost of doing business (CODB):
You can total the annual costs of non-reimbursable expenses like rent and equipment.
Another method requires you to collect all receipts from your business expenses for each day of your accounting period. This allows you to see which days of the month your company incurs the most expenses.
The key formula for calculating your bottom line (also known as your CODB) is:
Expenses + Hourly Rate x Calculated Hours = Bottom Line
It can be an excellent way to highlight which days of the month your company incurs the most expenses.
A sequential equation produced your CODB. Total annual costs equal non-reimbursable expenses plus desired salary.
To begin, make a list of all of your non-reimbursable expenses and total them. Include any office equipment or furniture you've purchased, such as computers or printers.
Finally, divide that total by the number of days in your accounting period. This provides you with a daily cost of doing business, which can aid in the ongoing guidance of your budget decisions.
It's critical to understand all of the factors that influence how much it costs to run your business so that you can plan for future growth and financial success.
Remember that the cost of doing business is not free, but it can guide your budgeting decisions by providing a benchmark against which to compare costs for growth planning.

Why is it significant?
The Cost of Doing Business is important because it allows you to calculate how much your company will spend each year.
You must understand the significance of this formula and how to calculate your CODB. What matters is that it gives you an idea of how much you will spend each month.

We can better prepare for the future and adjust our budgets by determining the cost of doing business.
The total annual costs divided by the number of billable days equals the cost of doing business in this comprehensive approach (CODB).

  1. Operational expenses
    The cost of doing business is referred to as operational costs. It can be difficult for owners and managers to identify and control their total operating costs.
    This knowledge, however, can be especially useful when attempting to optimise expenses and set a business budget for the coming quarters.
    To run a successful business, everyone in the organisation must understand their total costs. This can assist managers and owners in controlling, optimising, and budgeting their expenses.
    This is because operational costs are just one of many factors that eat into a company's profits and cash reserves.

    According to CB Insights' startup post-mortem report, 29% of enterprises cited a lack of capital as the primary reason for closure.
    As a result, it makes sense to identify areas of the business where expenses can be reduced on a regular basis. This can optimise business practises by informing owners of areas where they may be overspending, potentially preventing unnecessary capital losses.
  2. Costs, Direct and Indirect
    Direct costs are expenses that are directly related to the manufacture or delivery of goods and services. As a result, many variable costs can also be considered direct costs. Certain fixed costs, such as the cost of renting a manufacturing facility, can, however, be linked to production.
    Raw materials, manufacturing equipment, and production staff wages are examples of direct costs.
    In contrast, indirect costs are expenses that cannot be directly linked to a product or service provided by your company. Instead, indirect costs can have a wide-ranging impact on your business.

    Rent for the entire building housing the company's offices and utilities such as heating/cooling systems in those offices, as well as office equipment such as computers, printers, and telephones, are examples.
    To accurately estimate total expenses associated with running a business, business managers must understand the distinction between direct and indirect costs. This is because both have a significant impact on the cost of doing business (CODB).
  3. Product and time-frame costs
    Product costs are related to the manufacture and sale of goods. For retailers, this can include the total cost of supplies as well as the cost of delivering them to the warehouse.
    Meanwhile, period costs are closely related to the passage of time or a specific accounting period, such as a month or year.
    Rent expenses for an organisation, administrative assistant salaries, rent for the office building housing the company's offices, and utilities such as heating/cooling systems and telephones are examples.
    When recording financial information on a company's balance sheet or income statement, it is critical to understand that product costs can be treated differently than period costs.

    Product costs, for example, are frequently recorded as inventory assets when the goods are unsold and become costs of goods sold when they are purchased by consumers.
    Period costs, on the other hand, can be classified as either a period expense or a capital expense depending on whether their useful life exceeds one reporting cycle. If so, these costs can be factored into cost-of-goods-sold calculations and the creation of a business budget for the coming quarters.

    4. Costs that are fixed and those that are variable
    Fixed costs, also known as overhead costs, are expenses that must be incurred regardless of output. Rent, property taxes, and insurance payments are examples of this.
    Direct costs, on the other hand, can be considered fixed costs depending on a company's product or service offering. Raw materials, for example, are a common type of fixed cost that is used up until it is depleted.

    Variable costs include hourly rates for project-based workers and the cost of shipping goods from warehouses to individual customers.
    While both contribute significantly to the total cost of running a business, direct and indirect costs are distinguished by whether they can be directly traced back to a product or service.

    5. Future Sales and Labor Forecasting
    Forecasting future sales is a difficult task. Predicting future costs, on the other hand, is much easier.
    Accurate calculations of a company's total annual costs, such as how much money it will need to spend on rent, payroll, utilities, manufacturing, and shipping, are useful starting points when developing other forecasting projections for sales revenue and demand.
    Owners can make more informed decisions when planning budgets and upcoming investment needs if they have a clear understanding of how much it costs to run the business and what is required for future expenses.

    6. Calculating the Cost of Doing Business for a Business
    The CODB is the total cost of producing and selling goods or services. It includes indirect costs such as administrative assistant salaries as well as any product costs.
    It also entails accounting for company assets such as inventory and property, net of depreciation, in order to accurately calculate operating expenses and overhead.
    This figure can be used to forecast sales and revenue while also assisting owners in determining the CODB for additional products or services they may want to offer their customers in the future.
    More importantly, it provides an accurate picture of how much it costs a company to operate at any given time. This enables business owners to make informed decisions about pricing, sales projections, and company expansion.
    Owners can make better business decisions with better information if they have a strong understanding of what it costs to run their businesses, whether it's the CODB or another calculation based on product costs.
    As a result, knowing how to calculate the cost of doing business is critical for both new and experienced business owners.

    7. Determining the Cost of Goods Sold (COGS)
    The cost of goods sold (COGS) is one of the most important figures in any business owner's book.
    It is the total cost of purchasing raw materials for manufacturing, assembling them into finished products, and then selling these items to consumers or other businesses.
    However, many entrepreneurs find this process difficult, especially because there are so many variables to consider in order to produce an accurate projection.
    Make sure you understand the cost of doing business (CODB) formula and how to calculate total expenses associated with running a business to ensure you are on track to meet your business objectives.
    As long as you understand your CODB and COGS numbers, you can be confident that your company is on the right track.

    8. Examples of Cost of Doing Business (CODB) Formula Calculations
    The total expenses associated with running a business, defined as the cost of doing business, can be calculated in three steps:
  4. Determine direct and indirect costs, as well as selling expenses.
  5. Determine the CODB by calculating total annual expenses.
  6. To calculate the adjusted asset base, include assets and operating liabilities.
    The examples below show how to calculate the cost of doing business formula for a fictitious company called XYZ, which manufactures and sells hats.

    Conclusion
    The cost of doing business can be a useful benchmarking tool for evaluating a company's performance and determining its market position in comparison to competitors.
    When a business owner understands their company's cost of doing business, they can use that knowledge to determine what actions need to be taken to improve the profitability and overall health of the business.
    If your total cost per product is lower than your competitor's consumer price, you can review your processes to identify ways to reduce total cost so that you don't fall behind on unit price sales.
Running an agency?

Clientvenue is an all-in-one client portal and client requests management software.

Learn more